June 24, 1942 – This Day During The Korean War – Emory Lawrence Bennett Medal of Honor recipient

June 24, 1942 – Emory Lawrence Bennett Medal of Honor recipient (December 20, 1929 – June 24, 1951) was a United States Army soldier in the Korean War who received the U.S. military’s highest decoration, the Medal of Honor.

Private First Class Bennett’s official Medal of Honor citation reads:

PFC Bennett a member of Company B, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty in action against an armed enemy of the United Nations. At approximately 0200 hours, 2 enemy battalions swarmed up the ridge line in a ferocious banzai charge in an attempt to dislodge PFC Bennett’s company from its defensive positions. Meeting the challenge, the gallant defenders delivered destructive retaliation, but the enemy pressed the assault with fanatical determination and the integrity of the perimeter was imperiled. Fully aware of the odds against him, PFC Bennett unhesitatingly left his foxhole, moved through withering fire, stood within full view of the enemy, and, employing his automatic rifle, poured crippling fire into the ranks of the onrushing assailants, inflicting numerous casualties. Although wounded, PFC Bennett gallantly maintained his l-man defense and the attack was momentarily halted. During this lull in battle, the company regrouped for counterattack, but the numerically superior foe soon infiltrated into the position. Upon orders to move back, PFC Bennett voluntarily remained to provide covering fire for the withdrawing elements, and, defying the enemy, continued to sweep the charging foe with devastating fire until mortally wounded. His willing self-sacrifice and intrepid actions saved the position from being overrun and enabled the company to effect an orderly withdrawal. PFC Bennett’s unflinching courage and consummate devotion to duty reflect lasting glory on himself and the military service.

Emory Lawrence Bennett Medal of Honor recipient

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