December 30,This day during the Queen Anne’s War (1702–1713)

Originally posted on mwh52 - nominated as the most influential blog:

December 30, 1702 – Siege of St. Augustine 1702 was an action in Queen Anne’s War during November and December 1702. It was conducted by English provincial forces from the Province of Carolina and their native allies, under the command of Carolina’s governor James Moore, against the Spanish colonial fortress of Castillo de San Marcos at St. Augustine, in Spanish Florida. After destroying coastal Spanish communities north of St. Augustine, Moore’s forces arrived at St. Augustine on 10 November, and immediately began siege operations. The Spanish governor, Joseph de Zúñiga y Zérda, had had enough advance warning of their arrival to withdraw civilians and food supplies into the fortress, and to send messengers to nearby Spanish and French communities for relief. The English guns did little damage to the fortress walls, prompting Governor Moore to send an appeal to Jamaica for larger guns. The Spanish calls for relief were successful…

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December 30, This day during the War of 1812

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December 30, 1813 – The Battle of Buffalo took place during the War of 1812 between British Empire and the United States on December 30, 1813 in the State of New York, near the Niagara River. The British forces drove off the hastily-organized defenders and engaged in considerable plundering and destruction. The operation was conceived as an act of retaliation for the burning by American troops of the Canadian village of Newark (present day Niagara-on-the-Lake). Riall crossed the Niagara around midnight on December 29 and landed with most of his men some 2 miles (3.2 km) downstream of Black Rock in the early hours of December 30. He delegated Lieutenant Colonel John Gordon and the Royal Scots to land at Black Rock itself in order to attack the Americans from a different direction. Major General Amos Hall was first alerted to the British presence when Riall’s advance guard, the light…

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December 30, This day during the Korean War

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December 30, 1950 – In a swirling dogfight, USAF F-86 Sabers clash with MiG-15s over northwest Korea, soon to become known to the Americans as “MiG Alley” and “The Sausage” to the Soviets. While US pilots claim at least one MiG shot down and two damaged, the actual results are nil to nil. At this point the USAF has 7 actual kills versus 17 claims; the US Navy has a total of 2, and the VVS(Soviets) has 5 actual kills versus 64 claims.

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December 30, This day during the Iraq War

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December 30, 2006 – Ex Iraqi President Saddam Hussein is executed by hanging. The execution of Saddam Hussein took place on Saturday December 30, 2006. Saddam was sentenced to death by hanging, after being found guilty and convicted of crimes against humanity by the Iraqi Special Tribunal for the murder of 148 Iraqi Shi’ite in the town of Dujail in 1982, in retaliation for an assassination attempt against him. Two days prior to the execution, a letter written by Saddam appeared on the Arab Socialist Ba’ath Party web site. In the letter, he urged the Iraqi people to unite, and not to hate the people of countries that invaded Iraq, like the United States, but instead the decision-makers. He said he was ready to die a martyr and he said that this is his death sentence. In the hours before the execution, Saddam ate his last meal of chicken and…

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December 30, This day during the American Revolution

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December 30, 1780 – at Williams’ Fort, also Fort Williams or Williams Plantation, Newberry or possibly Laurens County, South Carolina – Brig. Gen.. Robert Cunningham with about 100 to 150 loyalists occupied Fort Williams, situated a few miles northwest of the main fort in the region, Ninety-Six. Washington sent a detachment of 40 dragoons under Cornel Simmons and some mounted militia under Lieut. Col. Joseph Hayes to take the fort. When they arrived, Simmons and Hayes demanded the fort’s surrender. Cunningham asked for some time to consult with his officers. During this time, some of the Loyalists slipped out of the back of the fort and into the woods. A few of them were spotted and killed, but most escaped. According to one account, Cunningham and most of his men were able to slip out a rear exit, though a few loyalists were taken. Another version states that the…

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December 30, This day during the American Revolution

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December 30, 1780 – at Hammond’s Store (Williamson’s Plantation), Laurens County, South Carolina – To encourage the British support in the upcountry of South Carolina, 250 loyalists under Col. Francis Waters, from Savannah, were sent into the Fair Forest area, at a location 15 to 20 miles south of Morgan’s camp on the Pacelot. Col William Washington with 75 of his dragoons and 200 mounted South Carolina militia under Lieut. Col. Joseph Hayes and Lieut. Col. James McCall was sent to attack him on the 29th. Learning of their approach Waters fell back to Hammond’s Store where on the 30th Washington caught up with and routed him. The Loyalists were beaten back and began a retreat. During the 7-mile retreating action, the Loyalists suffered heavy casualties. Morgan reported to Greene the Loyalists as losing 150 killed or wounded and 40 captured, a number probably indicating that many of Waters men…

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December 30, This day during the American Civil War

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December 30, 1862 – in Nolensville, Tennessee - On December 30, late in the day, Maj. Gen. Joseph Wheeler led several Confederate regiments to the village of Nolensville. They captured another Union wagon train that contained ammunition and medicine. They also captured and paroled more Union prisoners.

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